Functional variation of SHP-2 promoter is associated with preterm birth and delayed myelination and motor development in preterm infants

So Yeon Shim, Hye Jin Jeong, Hyo Jin Park, Eun Young Kwon, Bo Min Kim, Yang Ji Choi, Youn Hee Choi, Su Jin Cho, Ji Ha Choi, Eun Ae Park

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Src homology 2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase 2 (SHP-2) is a cytoplasmic tyrosine phosphatase that is highly expressed in hematopoietic cells and in the CNS and exerts opposite effects on signal transduction by exerting a neuroprotective or proapoptotic effect. Several mutations of SHP-2 have been found in children with myeloproliferative disorders or malignant leukemia, and some of these can affect brain development. In the present study, we aimed to identify and functionally characterize genetic variations in SHP-2 in 72 preterm and 58 full-term infants and to evaluate the effect of the variations on neurodevelopment in preterm infants. Twelve genetic variations were identified. Among them, two variations in the SHP-2 promoter, g.-317C > T and g.-273G > A, were found to significantly increase promoter activity, and the frequency of g.-273G > A was higher in preterm infants than in full-term infants. Two transcription factors, NF-κB and GABPα, were found to be involved in the transcriptional regulation of SHP-2 by the two above-mentioned variations. In particular, we found that g.-273G > A was significantly associated with delayed myelination and poor motor development in preterm infants. Our results suggest that a functional promoter variation in SHP-2 is associated with spontaneous preterm birth itself as well as white matter myelination and neurodevelopment.

Original languageEnglish
Article number6052
JournalScientific Reports
Volume7
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Dec 2017

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