Feasibility study of an optically actuated MR-compatible active needle

Seok Chang Ryu, Pierre Renaud, Richard J. Black, Bruce L. Daniel, Mark R. Cutkosky

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

44 Scopus citations

Abstract

An active needle is proposed for the development of MRI guided percutaneous procedures. The needle uses internal laser heating, conducted via optical fibers, of a shape memory alloy (SMA) actuator to produce bending in the distal section of the needle. Active bending of the needle as it is inserted allows it to reach small targets while overcoming the effects of interactions with surrounding tissue, which can otherwise deflect the needle away from its ideal path. The active section is designed to bend preferentially in one direction under actuation, and is also made from SMA for its combination of MR and bio-compatibility and its superelastic bending properties. A prototype, with a size equivalent to standard 16G biopsy needle, exhibits significant bending with a tip rotation of more than 10°. A numerical analysis and experiments provide information concerning the required amount of heating and guidance for design of efficient optical heating systems.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationIROS'11 - 2011 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems
Subtitle of host publicationCelebrating 50 Years of Robotics
Pages2564-2569
Number of pages6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2011
Event2011 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems: Celebrating 50 Years of Robotics, IROS'11 - San Francisco, CA, United States
Duration: 25 Sep 201130 Sep 2011

Publication series

NameIEEE International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems

Conference

Conference2011 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems: Celebrating 50 Years of Robotics, IROS'11
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CitySan Francisco, CA
Period25/09/1130/09/11

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