Fear conditioning occludes late-phase long-term potentiation at thalamic input synapses onto the lateral amygdala in rat brain slices

Ingie Hong, Jeongyeon Kim, Beomjong Song, Kyungjoon Park, Kisoon Shin, Khee Dong Eom, Pyung Lim Han, Sukwon Lee, Sukwoo Choi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Late-phase long-term potentiation (L-LTP) of excitatory synaptic transmission at thalamic input synapses onto the lateral amygdala (T-LA synapses) has been proposed as a cellular substrate for long-term fear memory. This notion is evidenced primarily by previous reports in which the same pharmacological treatments block both T-LA L-LTP and the consolidation of fear memory. In this study, we report that fear conditioning occludes L-LTP at T-LA synapses in brain slices prepared after fear memory consolidation. L-LTP was restored either when synaptic depotentiation was induced prior to L-LTP induction in brain slices prepared from conditioned rats or when brain slices were prepared from conditioned rats that had been exposed to subsequent fear extinction, which is a behavior paradigm known to induce in vivo synaptic depotentiation at T-LA synapses. These results suggest that fear conditioning recruits L-LTP-like mechanisms that are reversible and saturable at T-LA synapses.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)121-125
Number of pages5
JournalNeuroscience Letters
Volume506
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 6 Jan 2012

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea(NRF) grant funded by the Korea government(MEST) (No. 314-2008-1-C00341). I. Hong and K. Park was supported by Brain Korea 21 Research Fellowships from the Korea Ministry of Education.

Keywords

  • Amygdala
  • Depotentiation
  • Fear conditioning
  • Fear extinction
  • Late-phase LTP
  • Learning and memory
  • Synaptic plasticity

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