Factors Related to Symptomatic Failed Rotator Cuff Repair Leading to Revision Surgeries After Primary Arthroscopic Surgery

Sanghyeon Lee, In Park, Hye Ah Lee, Sang Jin Shin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: To evaluate the clinical characteristics of patients with symptomatic failed rotator cuff repair who required revision surgeries and to identify clinical and radiologic factors related to the need for revision surgery. Methods: Ninety-eight patients who were diagnosed with rotator cuff retear within 2 years after primary arthroscopic surgery were included. Patients were divided into 2 groups: patients who underwent revision surgery within 2 years postoperatively (44 patients, group I) and patients who did not require additional treatment due to minimal discomfort during the same period (54 patients, group II). Demographic and radiographic factors related to cuff healing were analyzed. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to evaluate factors related to revision surgery. Results: Group I showed significantly inferior clinical outcomes at the time of revision compared to group II (American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score; 54.0 ± 12.1 vs 86.5 ± 12.2, Constant score; 65.2 ± 10.8 vs 84.0 ± 11.4, P < .001). Total cholesterol level (210.2 ± 40.0 vs 189.7 ± 39.1, P = .012), low-density lipoprotein level (130.7 ± 28.7 vs 115.5 ± 26.9, P = .008), and fatty infiltration of the infraspinatus (20.5% vs 3.7%, P = .011) were significantly greater in group I than in group II. On postoperative magnetic resonance imaging, retear of the infraspinatus tendon occurred significantly more frequently in group I (81.8%) than in group II (37.0%, P < .001). In group I, relative changes in anteroposterior (AP) (19.2 ± 37.8) and mediolateral retear size (29.6 ± 90.7) were significantly greater than in group II (AP; −39.5 ± 19.2, mediolateral; −29.2 ± 26.8, P < .001). Relative change in AP retear size was the most powerful independent predictor of symptomatic failed rotator cuff repair (odds ratio 1.19, confidence interval 1.08-1.31, P < .001). Conclusions: Preoperative serum total cholesterol level, low-density lipoprotein levels, and fatty infiltration of the infraspinatus were significantly related to symptomatic failed rotator cuff repair. Relative change in AP retear size was the most powerful independent predictor of symptomatic failed rotator cuff repair. Level of Evidence: Level III, Case–control study

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2080-2088
Number of pages9
JournalArthroscopy - Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery
Volume36
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2020

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