Emerging invasive liver abscess caused by K1 serotype Klebsiella pneumoniae in Korea

D. R. Chung, S. S. Lee, H. R. Lee, H. B. Kim, H. J. Choi, J. S. Eom, J. S. Kim, Y. H. Choi, J. S. Lee, M. H. Chung, Y. S. Kim, H. Lee, M. S. Lee, C. K. Park

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

224 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: The high incidence of invasive liver abscess caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae in Taiwan, contrasted with the rareness of this disease in Western countries, has aroused special interest. There have been few detailed reports from other Asian countries. To investigate a current epidemiology of K. pneumoniae liver abscess in Korea and to determine K serotype distribution in K. pneumoniae strains causing liver abscess, we performed a nationwide prospective study. Methods: Community-acquired, culture-proven liver abscess cases were enrolled between 2004 and 2005. Etiologies and clinical features were analyzed. K. pneumoniae isolates were serotyped according to K antigen. Meta-analysis was done to determine the time trend of the etiologies of liver abscess in Korea. Results: Out of 371 cases collected prospectively, 290 (78.2%) were caused by K. pneumoniae. Most K. pneumoniae liver abscesses were monomicrobial. Diabetes mellitus was the most common underlying disease (39.9%). Distant metastatic infections were frequently observed (8.7%). magA PCR revealed that 95 (59.4%) out of 160 K. pneumoniae isolates belonged to the K1 serotype. Conclusions: Our study indicates that K. pneumoniae has emerged as a major etiologic agent of liver abscess in Korea, and these emerging infections seem to be attributable to invasive K. pneumoniae strains with capsular K1 serotype.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)578-583
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Infection
Volume54
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2007

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The Pan-STARRS1 Surveys have been made possible through contributions of the Institute for Astronomy, the University of Hawaii, the Pan-STARRS Project Office, the Max-Planck Society and its participating institutes, the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Heidelberg and the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Garching, The Johns Hopkins University, Durham University, the University of Edinburgh, Queen’s University Belfast, the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network Incorporated, the National Central University of Taiwan, the Space Telescope Science Institute, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration under Grant No. NNX08AR22G issued through the Planetary Science Division of the NASA Science Mission Directorate, the National Science Foundation under Grant No. AST-1238877, the University of Maryland, Eotvos Lorand University (ELTE), and the Los Alamos National Laboratory.

Funding Information:
The Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) collaboration includes the astronomical communities of Japan and Taiwan, and Princeton University. The HSC instrumentation and software were developed by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ), the Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (Kavli IPMU), the University of Tokyo, the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), the Academia Sinica Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics in Taiwan (ASIAA), and Princeton University. Funding was contributed by the FIRST program from the Japanese Cabinet Office, the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT), the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS), the Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), the Toray Science Foundation, NAOJ, Kavli IPMU, KEK, ASIAA, and Princeton University.

Funding Information:
This work is also based on zCOSMOS observations carried out using the Very Large Telescope at the ESO Paranal Observatory under Program ID: LP175.A-0839, on observations taken by the 3D-HST Treasury Program (GO 12177 and 12328) with the NASA/ESA HST, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555, on data from the VIMOS VLT Deep Survey, obtained from the VVDS database operated by Cesam, Laboratoire d’Astrophysique de Marseille, France, on data from the VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS). VIPERS has been performed using the ESO Very Large Telescope, under Large Program 182.A-0886. The participating institutions and funding agencies are listed at http://vipers.inaf.it. Funding for SDSS-III has been provided by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, the Participating Institutions, the National Science Foundation, and the US Department of Energy Office of Science. The SDSS-III web site is http://www.sdss3.org/. SDSS-III is managed by the Astrophysical Research Consortium for the Participating Institutions of the SDSS-III Collaboration including the University of Arizona, the Brazilian Participation Group, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Carnegie Mellon University, University of Florida, the French Participation Group, the German Participation Group, Harvard University, the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, the Michigan State/Notre Dame/JINA Participation Group, Johns Hopkins University, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics, Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, New Mexico State University, New York University, Ohio State University, Pennsylvania State University, University of Portsmouth, Princeton University, the Spanish Participation Group, University of Tokyo, University of Utah, Vanderbilt University, University of Virginia, University of Washington, and Yale University. GAMA is a joint European-Australasian project based around a spectroscopic campaign using the Anglo-Australian Telescope. The GAMA input catalog is based on data taken from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey. Complementary imaging of the GAMA regions is being obtained by a number of independent survey programs including GALEX MIS, VST KiDS, VISTA VIKING, WISE, Herschel-ATLAS, GMRT, and ASKAP, providing UV to radio coverage. GAMA is funded by the STFC (UK), the ARC (Australia), the AAO, and the participating institutions. The GAMA website is http://www.gama-survey.org/. Funding for the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey has been provided by NSF grants AST-95-09298, AST-0071048, AST-0507428, and AST-0507483, as well as NASA LTSA grant NNG04GC89G. Funding for PRIMUS is provided by NSF (AST-0607701, AST-0908246, AST-0908442, AST-0908354) and NASA (Spitzer-1356708, 08-ADP08-0019, NNX09AC95G). HM is supported by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. This work is in part supported by MEXT Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research on Innovative Areas (Nos. 15H05887, 15H05892, 15H05893).

Funding Information:
The DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey has been provided by NSF grants AST-95-09298, AST- 0071048, AST-0507428, and AST-0507483, as well as NASA LTSA grant NNG04GC89G. Funding for PRIMUS is provided by NSF (AST-0607701, AST-0908246, AST-0908442, AST-0908354) and NASA (Spitzer-1356708, 08-ADP08-0019, NNX09AC95G). HM is supported by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. This work is in part supported by MEXT Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research on Innovative Areas (Nos. 15H05887, 15H05892, 15H05893)

Keywords

  • Bacterial polysaccharides
  • Community-acquired infections
  • Etiology
  • Klebsiella pneumoniae
  • Liver abscess

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