Efficacy and safety of a new 10% intravenous immunoglobulin product in patients with primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP)

on behalf of the Korean GC IVIg Investigators

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: In the current study, we aimed to investigate the efficacy and safety of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg)-SN 10%, a new 10% IVIg formulation, in adult patients with severe primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP; platelet count < 20 × 109/L). Methods: Patients diagnosed as primary ITP, aged 19 years old or more, and had a platelet count of < 20 × 109/L by screening complete blood cell count performed within 2 weeks of study commencement were eligible. Patients received IVIg-SN 10% at a dose of 1 g/kg/day for two consecutive days. Response was defined as the achievement of a platelet count of ≥ 50 × 109/L at day 8. Results: Out of 81 eligible patients, 31 patients were newly diagnosed, 7 patients had persistent ITP, and 43 patients had chronic ITP. In intent-to-treat analysis, 61.3 patients (75.7%) achieved response and satisfied the pre-defined non-inferiority condition. Median time to response was 2 days and mean duration of maintaining response after the completion of IVIg therapy was 9.13 ± 8.40 days. Response rates were not found to be dependent on the phase of ITP or previous treatment for ITP. The drug was well tolerated and the frequency of mucocutaneous bleeding decreased during the study period. Conclusion: In summary, IVIg-SN 10% formulation was found to be safe and effective in adult ITP patients (Trial registry at ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT02063789).

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere142
JournalJournal of Korean Medical Science
Volume33
Issue number19
DOIs
StatePublished - 7 May 2018

Keywords

  • Bleeding
  • Hemorrhage
  • Immune thrombocytopenia
  • IV immunoglobulins
  • Thrombocytopenia

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