Effects of pure curry consumption on life span, body weight, and weight of organs in mice transplanted with cancer cells

Ki Moon Park, Kyung Mi Kim, Young Seo Park, Sung Sik Yoon, Myong Soo Chung

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The cytotoxic effects of spices containing pure curry on animals with cancer cells was tested in vivo by inducing cancer experimentally by transplanting sarcoma - 180 cancer cells into Isolated Barrier Room System (IBRS) #202 mice. The consumption of a normal diet supplemented with 5% pure curry prolonged the survival period of cancer-cell-transplanted mice by 20.97% (0.01) relative to mice that consumed a normal diet without pure curry. The liver was significantly heavier in the curry groups with or without tumor cell transplantation than in the group consuming a normal diet; the kidney was significantly lighter in cancer-cell-transplanted mice than in nontreated mice (0.01), regardless of the amount of pure curry in the diet; the heart weight did not differ significantly between the groups.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)329-350
Number of pages22
JournalEcology of Food and Nutrition
Volume45
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2006

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The cytotoxic effects of spices containing pure curry on animals with cancer cells was tested in vivo by inducing cancer experimentally by transplanting sarcoma—180 cancer cells into Isolated Barrier Room System (IBRS) #202 mice. The consumption of a normal diet supplemented with 5% pure curry This study was supported by a grant from the OTTOGI Foundation in South Korea. Address correspondence to Myong-Soo Chung, Department of Food Science and Technology, College of Engineering, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 120-750, South Korea. E-mail: mschung@ewha.ac.kr

Keywords

  • Body weight
  • Cytotoxicity
  • Life span
  • Mice
  • Pure curry
  • Sarcoma-180

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