Effective Disaster Measures for Cambodia: Implications from Focus Group Interview with Potential Young Professionals in Cambodia

Hye Sook Jeon, Kwonmin Lee, Yeseul Lee, Eungyu Park, Yong Sang Choi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Cambodia suffers from natural disasters despite rapid economic growth. This study diagnosed the current problems of Cambodia’s disaster prevention and preparedness, and found more effective disaster measures through two focus group interviews. Participants are potential young professionals studying in Korea as an international graduate student and have been involved in disaster-related activities in Cambodia. Three major disaster measures have been proposed here. First, the effectiveness of government policy should be improved. To implement the current policy realistically and effectively, we need to secure budgets, support technology development, and expand formal education and training. Second, the private sector should cooperate with civil society to provide better support to the community through corporate social responsibility activities. Specifically, non-governmental organizations should strengthen training and monitoring. As a current important issue, hydropower plants must preserve environmental values according to careful planning. Finally, community-based activities must be actively conducted (e.g., active tree planting and differentiated disaster response training by gender or level). The study would serve as preliminary data to support the Cambodian disaster management plan in the future.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)259-275
Number of pages17
JournalSocial Work in Public Health
Volume36
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2021

Keywords

  • Cambodia
  • Disaster prevention
  • disaster preparedness
  • focus group interview
  • young professional

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