Effect of baseplate size on primary glenoid stability and impingement-free range of motion in reverse shoulder arthroplasty

Soo Won Chae, Soung Yon Kim, Haea Lee, Joung Ro Yon, Juneyoung Lee, Seung Ho Han

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

32 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Use of a baseplate with a smaller diameter in reverse shoulder arthroplasty is increasing, especially in patients with a small glenoid or glenoid wear. However, the effect of a smaller baseplate on stability of the glenoid component has not been evaluated. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine whether a smaller baseplate (25 mm) is beneficial to the initial stability of the glenoid component compared to that with a baseplate of a commonly used size (29 mm). Methods: Micromotion of glenoid components attached to 14 scapulae of fresh-frozen cadavers was measured and compared between 25- And 29-mm baseplates in biomechanical testing. Impingement-free range of motion in abduction, adduction, internal rotation, and external rotation was evaluated by using a simulated computer model constructed based on the same fresh-frozen cadavers used in biomechanical testing. Results: Micromotion at the inferior third of the glenoid-glenosphere interface was higher in the 29-mm baseplate group than in the 25-mm baseplate group during both 0.7- And 1-body weight cyclic loading in biomechanical testing. Adduction deficit was smaller, and total impingement-free range of motion from abduction to adduction and rotation were greater in the 25-mm baseplate group than in the 29-mm baseplate group in the simulated computer model. Conclusions: Use of a baseplate with a smaller diameter (25 mm) in reverse shoulder arthroplasty is suitable for improving the primary stability of the glenoid component. With a smaller baseplate, impingement-free range of motion is optimized in a smaller glenoid.

Original languageEnglish
Article number417
JournalBMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
Volume15
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The authors thank Sang-Hyun Kim, assistant manager of the Catholic Institute for Applied Anatomy, for his technical assistance. This research was supported by the Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea, funded by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (2010–0008534, 2012–0000792).

Publisher Copyright:
© 2014 Chae et al.

Keywords

  • Biomechanical testing
  • Reverse shoulder arthroplasty
  • Simulated computer model
  • Smaller baseplate

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