Does an Ultra-Short Anatomic Cementless Femoral Stem Improve Long-Term (Up to 17 Years) Results in Patients Younger Than 30 Years?

Young Hoo Kim, Jang Won Park, Young Soo Jang, Eun Jung Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: The purpose of this long-term (up to 17 years) follow-up study was to determine: (1) clinical results and evidence of clicking or squeaking sounds; (2) radiographic results, including rates of osseointegration, bone remodeling, and osteolysis; (3) rates of complications including thigh pain, periprosthetic fracture, and ceramic fracture; (4) rates of revision; and (5) survival rates of implants in patients younger than 30 years. Methods: We analyzed the results of 240 consecutive primary total hip arthroplasty in 180 patients (118 men and 62 women who had a mean age of 27 years (range, 21 to 30 years)). The mean follow-up was 16 years (range, 14 to 17 years). Results: Mean Harris hip score, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities score, and University of California, Los Angeles activity score were 93 points, 18 points, and 7 points, respectively, at final follow-up. Radiographically, all of the acetabular components and all but two femoral components were well-fixed at the final follow-up. No hip had osteolysis or exhibited Grade 3 stress shielding. All but two patients had no groin or thigh pain. No hip had a periprosthetic or ceramic fracture. Eight hips (3%) exhibited squeaking sounds. Two acetabular components and two femoral stems were revised. The survival of the acetabular and femoral component was 99.2% (95% confidence interval, 94 to 100%). Conclusion: The results of the present long-term study of ultra-short anatomic cementless femoral stems suggest excellent clinical and radiographic results in patients younger than 30 years.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Arthroplasty
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

Keywords

  • anatomic
  • cementless
  • femoral stem
  • ultra-short
  • younger than 30 year old

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