Design of and subjective response to on-body input for people with visual impairments

Uran Oh, Leah Findlater

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

22 Scopus citations

Abstract

For users with visual impairments, who do not necessarily need the visual display of a mobile device, non-visual on-body interaction (e.g., Imaginary Interfaces) could provide accessible input in a mobile context. Such interaction provides the potential advantages of an always-available input surface, and increased tactile and proprioceptive feedback compared to a smooth touchscreen. To investigate preferences for and design of accessible on-body interaction, we conducted a study with 12 visually impaired participants. Participants evaluated five locations for on-body input and compared on-phone to on-hand interaction with one versus two hands. Our findings show that the least preferred areas were the face/neck and the forearm, while locations on the hands were considered to be more discreet and natural. The findings also suggest that participants may prioritize social acceptability over ease of use and physical comfort when assessing the feasibility of input at different locations of the body. Finally, tradeoffs were seen in preferences for touchscreen versus on-body input, with on-body input considered useful for contexts where one hand is busy (e.g., holding a cane or dog leash). We provide implications for the design of accessible on-body input.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationASSETS14 - Proceedings of the 16th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers and Accessibility
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery
Pages115-122
Number of pages8
ISBN (Electronic)9781450327206
DOIs
StatePublished - 20 Oct 2014
Event16th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers and Accessibility, ASSETS 2014 - Rochester, United States
Duration: 20 Oct 201422 Oct 2014

Publication series

NameASSETS14 - Proceedings of the 16th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers and Accessibility

Conference

Conference16th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers and Accessibility, ASSETS 2014
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityRochester
Period20/10/1422/10/14

Keywords

  • Design recommendations
  • Eyes-free interaction
  • Gestural interfaces
  • Mobile
  • On-body input
  • Visual impairments

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