Cultural context and psychological needs in Canada and Brazil testing a self-determination approach to the internalization of cultural practices, identity, and well-being

Valery I. Chirkov, Richard M. Ryan, Chelsea Willness

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

155 Scopus citations

Abstract

Brazilian and Canadian students reported on the importance and frequency of cultural practices and values reflecting Triandis's cultural model of individualistic-collectivistic and horizontal-vertical orientations. They also rated their relative autonomy for these practices and the degree to which parents and teachers supported self-determination theory's psychological needs for autonomy, competence, and relatedness. It was predicted that in both samples, despite the mean differences, greater relative autonomy and need support would be associated with greater well-being and cultural identity. It was also expected that vertical cultural orientations would be less well internalized in both Brazilian and Canadian groups. Means and covariance structure analyses verified measurement comparability. Results generally supported the hypotheses. Discussion focuses on the importance of internalization across cultural forms, the differentiation of autonomy from individualism and independence, and the relations between horizontal cultural orientations and psychological needs support.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)423-443
Number of pages21
JournalJournal of Cross-Cultural Psychology
Volume36
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2005

Keywords

  • Cultural dimensions
  • Internalization of culture
  • Self-determination theory
  • Well-being

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