CROSS-CULTURAL COMPARISON OF PERCEPTIONS ON THE GLOBAL SCIENTIFIC LITERACY WITH AUSTRALIAN, CHINESE, AND KOREAN MIDDLE SCHOOL STUDENTS

Kongju Mun, Hyunju Lee, Sung Won Kim, Kyunghee Choi, Sung Youn Choi, Joseph S. Krajcik

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

In this study, we explored the extent to which Australian, Chinese, and Korean middle school students perceived themselves to have scientific literacy as global citizens and attempted to identify differences and/or commonalities in their perceptions. A total of 655 middle school students (8th and 9th grades; 358 girls and 297 boys) from the three countries participated in the study. We used Global Scientific Literacy Questionnaires (GSLQ) as a survey instrument to assess the students’ perceptions. The GSLQ was developed based on a conceptual framework of Scientific Literacy suggested by Choi, Kim, Lee, Mun, Choi, Krajcik & Shin (2011) and Choi, Lee, Shin, Kim & Krajcik (Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 48(6), 670–697, 2011) for citizenship education in the 21st century. The results indicated that most of the students from the three countries showed a tendency toward higher scores for Science as human endeavor; the lowest scores were in Meta-cognition and self-direction. A pattern of gender difference was also examined among the three countries. We suggest future research questions based on a cross-cultural perspective in order to explore the reasons for the existence of these similarities and differences.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)437-465
Number of pages29
JournalInternational Journal of Science and Mathematics Education
Volume13
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 May 2015

Keywords

  • character and values
  • citizenship education
  • cross-cultural
  • habits of mind
  • meta-cognition and self-direction
  • science as human endeavor
  • scientific literacy

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