Correlation between physical features of elementary school children and chest compression depth

Tai Hwan Uhm, Jae Keun Oh, Jeong Hyun Park, Sook Ja Yang, Jee Hee Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Introduction: The height and body weight of 6th grade elementary school children may have influence on chest compression. Materials & methods: In accordance with the 2005 American Heart Association guidelines and 2006 Korean Association of CardioPulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) guidelines, a 25-minute audiovisual presentation and practical demonstration of CPR were presented by the researchers and assistants. The assistants supervised and corrected the practical performance of the students who performed 5 cycles of CPR (2 minutes each) with the aid of the Laerdal Resusci® Anne SkillReporter™. The students then carried out another 5 cycles of CPR (2 minutes each) using the skill reporter; and a short report was printed. Results: The correlation coefficient between body weight and chest compression was 0.467 (p=0.000), and the correlation coefficient between height and chest compression was 0.309 (p=0.009). The intercept between body weight and chest compression was 21.763 (p=0.000), and the slope was 0.324 (p=0.000). Student height showed no linear correlation with chest compression depth. Conclusions: The body weight of 6th grade elementary school children showed moderate correlation with chest compression depth. A minimal body weight of 50 kg is required to attain a standard chest compression depth of 38 mm. With improved training, some students with body weight less than 50 kg may also achieve satisfactory performance of CPR.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)218-223
Number of pages6
JournalHong Kong Journal of Emergency Medicine
Volume17
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2010

Keywords

  • Body height
  • Body weight
  • Cardiopulmonary resuscitation

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