Conducting Nanomaterial Sensor Using Natural Receptors

Oh Seok Kwon, Hyun Seok Song, Tai Hyun Park, Jyongsik Jang

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

158 Scopus citations

Abstract

One of the recently emerging topics in biotechnology is natural receptors including G protein-coupled receptors, ligand-gated ion channels, enzyme-linked receptors, and intracellular receptors, due to their molecular specificity. These receptors, other than intracellular receptors, which are membrane proteins expressed on the cell membrane, can detect extracellular stimuli. Many researchers have utilized cells with natural receptors embedded in the cellular membrane for human sense-mimicking platforms based on electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, quartz crystal microbalances, surface plasmon resonance, and surface acoustic waves. In addition, integration of conducting nanomaterials and natural receptors allows highly sensitive and selective responses toward target molecules, enabling, for example, nanobioelectronic noses for odorants, nanobioelectronic tongues for tastants, and G-protein-coupled receptor sensors for hormones, dopamine, cadaverine, geosmin, trimethylamine, etc. Moreover, as a part of nanobioelectronic sensors, natural receptors can be produced in various forms, such as peptides, proteins, nanovesicles, and nanodiscs, and each sensor can provide an ultralow limit of detection. In this Review, we discuss biosensors with natural receptors and then especially focus on natural receptor-conjugated conducting nanomaterial sensors. To provide a fundamental understanding, the sections encompass (1) the fabrication of conducting nanomaterials, (2) the production of natural receptors, (3) the characteristics of natural receptors, (4) the technology for immobilizing both components, and (5) their sensing applications. Finally, perspective is given on a new development in the use of natural receptors in a wide range of industries, such as food, cosmetics, and healthcare. In addition, artificial olfactory codes will be characterized by signal processing in the near future, leading to human olfactory standardization.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)36-93
Number of pages58
JournalChemical Reviews
Volume119
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 9 Jan 2019

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work was supported by the Brain Research Program through the National Research Foundation (NRF) of Korea goverment (MSIT) (NRF-2016M3C7A1905384); a Technology Program for establishing biocide safety management from the Korea Environmental Industry & Technology Institute, funded by the Korea Ministry of Environment (no. RE 201804085).

Funding Information:
This work was supported by the Brain Research Program through the National Research Foundation (NRF) of Korea goverment (MSIT) (NRF-2016M3C7A1905384); a Technology Program for establishing biocide safety management from the Korea Environmental Industry & Technology Institute, funded by the Korea Ministry of Environment (no. RE 201804085); BioNano Health-Guard Research Center funded by MSIT of Korea as Global Frontier Project (H-GUARD_2013M3A6B2078950); the NRF funded by the Korean government (MSIT) (NRF-2018R1A2B3004498); the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) Grant funded by the Ministry of Science and ICT for First-Mover Program for Accelerating Disruptive Technology Development (NRF-2018M3C1B9069834); the Korea Basic Science Institute (D38410); KIST Institutional Program (no. 2E28390); the National Research Council of Science & Technology (NST) grant by the Korea government (MSIP) (no. CRC-16-01-KRICT); and the KRIBB Initiative Research Program.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2018 American Chemical Society.

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