Concordance of results of blood and tissue cultures from patients with pyogenic spondylitis: a retrospective cohort study

J. Y. Bae, C. J. Kim, U. J. Kim, K. H. Song, E. S. Kim, S. J. Kang, M. D. Oh, K. H. Park, N. J. Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: To investigate the concordance of results of blood and tissue cultures in patients with pyogenic spondylitis. Methods: We searched for patients with pyogenic spondylitis in whom microorganisms were isolated from both blood and tissue cultures by retrospective review of medical records in three tertiary university-affiliated hospitals between January 2005 and December 2015. The species and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of isolates from blood and tissue cultures were compared. Results: Among 141 patients with pyogenic spondylitis in whom microorganisms were isolated from both blood and tissue cultures, the species of blood and tissue isolates were identical in 135 patients (95.7%, 135/141). Excluding the four anaerobic isolates, we investigated antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of 131 isolates of the same species from blood and tissue cultures. Antibiotic susceptibility patterns were identical in 128 patients (97.7%, 128/131). The most common isolates were Staphylococcus aureus (86 patients; 85 concordant and one discordant), followed by streptococcus (24 patients; 22 concordant and two discordant), and Escherichia coli (eight patients; all concordant). Conclusions: We suggest that a positive blood culture from patients with pyogenic spondylitis could preclude the need for additional tissue cultures, especially when S. aureus and streptococcus grew in blood cultures.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)279-282
Number of pages4
JournalClinical Microbiology and Infection
Volume24
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2018

Keywords

  • Blood
  • Culture
  • Spondylitis
  • Staphylococcus aureus
  • Tissue

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