Concentrations of carbonaceous species in particles at Seoul and Cheju in Korea

Yong Pyo Kim, Kil Choo Moon, Jong Hoon Lee, Nam Jun Baik

Research output: Contribution to journalConference articlepeer-review

101 Scopus citations

Abstract

Concentrations of elemental carbon (EC) and organic carbon (OC) in particles at Seoul and Cheju Island, Korea were observed in 1994. PM10 and PM2.5 were collected by a modified SCAQS (Southern California Air Quality Study) sampler from Seoul during June 1994 and PM2.5 were collected by a low-volume sampler at Cheju Island during July and August 1994. The selective thermal oxidation method with MnO2 catalyst was used for analysis. The EC concentrations from Seoul were higher than those at Los Angeles, USA during the SCAQS study while the OC. concentrations were comparable to those during the SCAQS study. At Cheju Island, the OC concentrations were higher than those at other clean areas in the world but the EC concentrations were lower than or comparable to those at other clean areas in the world. The OC to EC ratios of Seoul suggest that the carbonaceous species are mostly from primary emission sources. In Cheju, during July 1994 air pollutant levels were high and it was suggested that atmospheric transformation/transport of organics and biogenic emissions were main sources of carbonaceous species in particles. The carbonaceous species levels were low during August 1994 and it was suggested that the levels could be considered as marine background concentrations in the region during summer.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2751-2758
Number of pages8
JournalAtmospheric Environment
Volume33
Issue number17
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1999
EventProceedings of the 1997 6th International Conference on Carbonaceous Particles in the Atmosphere - Vienna, Austria
Duration: 22 Sep 199724 Sep 1997

Keywords

  • OC-EC ratio
  • PM
  • PM
  • Primary and secondary organic aerosol

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