Clinical impact of pre-hypertension on the risk of cancer in male and female subjects

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Abstract

There are few studies assessing pre-hypertension and an impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and their combined effects on the cancer risk. We investigated the impact of pre-hypertension on cancer risk and IFG, and their combined effects on the cancer risk. This study included 371,762 subjects (≥40 years) who had never been diagnosed with hypertension, diabetes mellitus (DM), and cancer before. During a mean follow-up of 10.06 ± 1.86 years, 35,605 (9.58%) of the subjects developed cancer. In men only, cancer risk was significantly increased with an increase in the blood pressure (BP) (P for trend < 0.001), and were increased in the hypertension range, but not the pre-hypertension range. When analyzing the combination effect of BP and fasting glucose, cancer risks were serially increased with an increase in the fasting glucose in a dose-dependent manner, but not with an increase in BP. These results were more consistently significant in the never-smoker and non-alcohol drinking groups. However, in women, there was no significant difference. In conclusions, increased BP status or the fasting serum glucose level status were associated with cancer risk in men. Furthermore, the combination of both pre-hypertension and IFG also was associated with a cancer risk in men.

Original languageEnglish
Article number9974
JournalScientific Reports
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Dec 2020

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