Better oral hygiene is associated with a reduced risk of osteoporotic fracture: a nationwide cohort study

Jung Hyun Park, Moo Seok Park, Hyung Jun Kim, Heajung Lee, Jin Woo Kim, Tae Jin Song

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: The aim of this study was to examine the longitudinal association between oral health parameters and osteoporotic fracture. Methods: The study included participants who received oral health screening by dentists from the National Health Screening cohort database of Korea between 2003 and 2006. The primary outcome was osteoporotic fracture occurrence, which was defined using specific international classification of diseases-10 codes; vertebral fracture (S22.0, S22.1, S32.0, S32.7, T08, M48.4, M48.5, and M49.5), hip fracture (S72.0 and S72.1), distal radius fracture (S52.5 and S52.6), and humerus fracture (S42.2 and S42.3). The presence of periodontitis and various oral health examination findings, such as missing teeth, caries, frequency of tooth brushing, and dental scaling, were analyzed using a Cox proportional hazard model to assess their association with osteoporotic fracture occurrence. Results: The analysis included a total of 194,192 participants, among whom 16,683 (8.59%) developed osteoporotic fracture during a median follow-up of 10.3 years. Poor oral health status, including periodontitis (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR]: 1.09, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.01–1.18, p = 0.039), a higher number of missing teeth (≥15; aHR: 1.59, 95% CI: 1.45–1.75, p < 0.001), and dental caries (≥6; aHR: 1.17, 95% CI: 1.02–1.35, p = 0.030), was associated with an increased risk of osteoporotic fracture. On the other hand, better oral hygiene behaviors such as brushing teeth frequently (≥3 times per day; aHR: 0.82, 95% CI: 0.78–0.86, p < 0.001) and having dental scaling within 1 year (aHR: 0.87, 95% CI: 0.84–0.90, p < 0.001) were negatively associated with the occurrence of osteoporotic fracture. Conclusion: The study found that poor oral health, such as periodontitis, missing teeth, and dental caries, was associated with an increased risk of osteoporotic fracture. Conversely, good oral hygiene behaviors like frequent teeth brushing and dental scaling within 1 year were associated with a reduced risk. Further research is needed to confirm this association.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1253903
JournalFrontiers in Endocrinology
Volume14
DOIs
StatePublished - 2023

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
Copyright © 2023 Park, Park, Kim, Lee, Kim and Song.

Keywords

  • epidemiology
  • oral hygiene
  • osteoporotic fracture
  • periodontitis
  • tooth brushing

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