Beliefs and Social Norms as Precursors of Environmental Support: The Joint Influence of Collectivism and Socioeconomic Status

David K. Sherman, John A. Updegraff, Michelle S. Handy, Kimin Eom, Heejung S. Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

The present research investigates how the cultural value of collectivism interacts with socioeconomic status (SES) to influence the basis of action. Using a U.S. national sample (N = 2,538), the research examines how these sociocultural factors jointly moderate the strength of two precursors of environmental support: beliefs about climate change and perceived descriptive norms. SES and collectivism interacted with climate change beliefs such that beliefs predicted environmental support (i.e., proenvironmental behaviors and policy support) more strongly for those who were high in SES and low in collectivism than for all other groups. This interaction was explained, in part, by sense of control. For descriptive norms, SES and collectivism did not interact but rather norms predicted action most strongly for those high in collectivism and high in SES. These findings demonstrate the theoretical and applied importance of examining multiple sociocultural characteristics together to understand the factors that drive action.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)463-477
Number of pages15
JournalPersonality and Social Psychology Bulletin
Volume48
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2022

Keywords

  • climate change beliefs
  • collectivism
  • environmental support
  • norms
  • socioeconomic status

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