Association of nutritional status with cognitive stage in the elderly Korean population: The Korean brain aging study for the early diagnosis and prediction of alzheimer’s disease

Jae Won Jang, Yeshin Kim, Yong Ho Choi, Jong Min Lee, Bora Yoon, Kyung Won Park, Si Eun Kim, Hee Jin Kim, Soo Jin Yoon, Jee Hyang Jeong, Eun Joo Kim, Na Yeon Jung, Jihye Hwang, Ju Hee Kang, Jin Yong Hong, Seong Hye Choi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background and Purpose Epidemiological studies have suggested the presence of strong correlations among diet, lifestyle, and dementia onset. However, these studies have unfortunately had major limitations due to their inability to fully control the various potential con-founders affecting the nutritional status. The purpose of the current study was to determine the nutritional status of participants in the Korean Brain Aging Study for the Early Diagnosis and Prediction of Alzheimer’s Disease (KBASE) and to identify clinical risk factors for being at risk of malnutrition or being malnourished. Methods Baseline data from 212 participants [119 cognitively unimpaired (CU), 56 with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 37 with dementia] included in the KBASE database were analyzed. All participants underwent a comprehensive cognitive test and MRI at baseline. The presence of malnutrition at baseline was measured by the Mini Nutritional Assessment score. We examined the cross-sectional relationships of clinical findings with nutritional status using multiple logistic regression applied to variables for which p<0.2 in the univariate analysis. Differences in cortical thickness according to the nutritional status were also investigated. Results After adjustment for demographic, nutritional, and neuropsychological factors, participants with dementia had a significantly higher odds ratio (OR) for being at risk of malnutrition or being malnourished than CU participants [OR=5.98, 95% CI=1.20–32.97] whereas participants with MCI did not (OR=0.62, 95% CI=0.20–1.83). Cortical thinning in the at-risk/ malnutrition group was observed in the left temporal area. Conclusions Dementia was found to be an independent predictor for the risk of malnutrition compared with CU participants. Our findings further suggest that cortical thinning in left temporal regions is related to the nutritional status.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)292-300
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Clinical Neurology (Korea)
Volume15
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2019

Keywords

  • Cerebral cortex
  • Dementia
  • Nutritional status

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