Association between Seafood Intake and Cardiovascular Disease in South Korean Adults: A Community-Based Prospective Cohort Study

Gyu Hee Park, Jung Hee Cho, Donglim Lee, Yangha Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the most common non-communicable diseases causing 18.6 million deaths worldwide. Several studies have revealed that seafood consumption has a protective effect against CVD. This study investigated the correlation between CVD and seafood intake based on a 10-year follow-up of the Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study (KoGES). The study population, which included 6565 adults age, 55.65 (±8.68), was divided into seafood intake-based tertiles. CVD included myocardial infarction, coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure, cerebrovascular disease, and peripheral vascular disease. At baseline, participants with low seafood intake also had low eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) intakes. Prospectively, hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for CVD were analyzed using Cox proportional hazards regression models. Seafood intake exhibited a significantly inverse relationship with the cumulative CVD incidence over 10 years regardless of sex (women: log-rank test p < 0.001 and men: log-rank test p < 0.0401). The longitudinal association of low seafood intake with the CVD risk was significantly stronger in female participants after adjusting for confounding variables (HR (95% confidence interval (CI)) = 0.718 (0.519–0.993) p-trend = 0.043). These results suggested that seafood consumption potentially ameliorates CVD risk in middle-aged adults.

Original languageEnglish
Article number4864
JournalNutrients
Volume14
Issue number22
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2022

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 by the authors.

Keywords

  • cardiovascular disease
  • longitudinal study
  • seafood intake

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