Applying the Lifestyle Routine Activities Theory to Understand Physical and Nonphysical Peer Victimization

Sujung Cho, Jun Sung Hong, Dorothy L. Espelage, Kyung Shick Choi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

21 Scopus citations

Abstract

Peer victimization is a serious problem, and understanding where, with whom, and how long victims spend their time is important. Applying the lifestyle routine activities theory (LRAT), this study examines the association between 4 components of LRAT and physical and nonphysical peer victimization. Using the 2007 National Crime Victimization Survey, we examined Poisson and negative binomial regression models to explain whether physical and nonphysical peer victimization was affected by measures of routine activities. Our findings indicate that students’ exposure and proximity to motivated offenders, school environment, capable guardianship, and target attractiveness were associated with risk of peer victimization. Findings also reveal that risk factors varied depending on the type of victimization.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)297-315
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Aggression, Maltreatment and Trauma
Volume26
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 16 Mar 2017

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2017 Taylor & Francis.

Keywords

  • Adolescents
  • bullying
  • lifestyle routine activities theory
  • peer relationships
  • youth

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