Alcohol use disorders and increased risk of adverse birth complications and outcomes: An 11-year nationwide cohort study

Sarah Soyeon Oh, Yongho Jee, Eun Cheol Park, Young Ju Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

For women who suffer from Alcohol Use Disorders (AUDs), the use of alcohol before and/or during pregnancy may result in various birth complications, including miscarriage, stillbirth, or preterm delivery. Thus, this study aimed to explore whether Alcohol Use Disorders (AUDs) are associated with increased risk of adverse birth complications and outcomes. A total of 76,799 deliveries between 2003 and 2013 in the Korean National Health Insurance Service National Sample Cohort (NHIS-NSC) were analyzed. Women with an AUD diagnosis preceding delivery were identified as individuals with alcohol dependence. A multivariate Cox proportional hazards model was used to estimate the hazard ratio of adverse birth complications and outcomes associated with alcohol dependence. Diagnosis of an AUD was associated with increased risk of adverse birth complications (Hazard Ratio [HR]: 1.15, 95% CI: 1.01–1.31, p = 0.0302). This was especially the case for women whose AUD diagnosis was in the same year as their delivery (HR: 1.53, 95% CI: 1.24–1.88, p < 0.0001). AUDs were associated with increased risk of adverse birth outcomes, especially when prevalent in the same year as a woman’s delivery. Our study confirms that the monitoring of expecting women with a diagnosis of alcohol-related problems may be useful in preventing adverse birth complications.

Original languageEnglish
Article number8515
Pages (from-to)1-10
Number of pages10
JournalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Volume17
Issue number22
DOIs
StatePublished - 2 Nov 2020

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

Keywords

  • Birth complications
  • Prenatal alcohol exposure
  • Preterm birth

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