Acupuncture does not protect against 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine-induced damage of dopaminergic neurons in a preclinical mouse model of Parkinson's disease

Hui Jun Yang, Yu Gao, Ji Young Yun, Young Eun Kim, Gwanhee Ehm, Ji Yeon Lee, Min Yung Yoon, Young Shin Lee, Han Joon Kim, Beomseok Jeon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Acupuncture treatment, a complementary and alternative medicine, is associated with a suggested neuroprotective effect in previous preclinical studies of Parkinson's disease (PD); however, results from human clinical trials have been mixed or unsuccessful. Recent systematic reviews of translational neuroprotective studies showed that the supposed efficacy is confounded by low methodological quality, particularly by a lack of randomization and concealed allocation. We sought to replicate previous experimental findings with a study design that mitigates the introduction of bias, including randomization, blinded outcome measures, sham acupuncture application, and allocation concealment by blinded neurotoxin administration. We performed 12 sessions of manual acupuncture at acupoint GB34 (yanglingquan) in mice that were administered the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine neurotoxin for five consecutive days. In this animal model of PD, acupuncture treatment did not attenuate tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive neuronal death, depletion of striatal dopamine levels, or reduced striatal tyrosine hydroxylase expression. Our results indicate that acupuncture is not neuroprotective against nigrostriatal loss in a subacute 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine mouse model of PD.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)50-55
Number of pages6
JournalNeuroReport
Volume28
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2017

Keywords

  • 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine
  • acupuncture
  • Parkinson's disease
  • striatum
  • substantia nigra

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Acupuncture does not protect against 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine-induced damage of dopaminergic neurons in a preclinical mouse model of Parkinson's disease'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this