Acculturation, Acculturative Stress, and Depressive Symptoms in International Migrants: A Study with Vietnamese Women in South Korea

Yong Ju Cho, Yuri Jang, Jung Eun Ko, Sun Hae Lee, Soo Kyung Moon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

Globally, there have been increasing numbers of migrant women; these women are at an increased risk for depressive symptoms. The purpose of this study was to examine the associations among acculturation, acculturative stress and depressive symptoms in Vietnamese women who migrated to South Korea through marriages. We hypothesized that acculturative stress would serve as a mediator in the relationship between acculturation and depressive symptoms. Our findings from surveys with 217 Vietnamese immigrant women showed that the indirect effect of acculturation on depressive symptoms, mediated through acculturative stress [−.15 (.04)], was significant (bias corrected 95% confidence interval for the indirect effect = −.25, −.08). Low levels of acculturation increased acculturative stress, which in turn led to the elevated symptoms of depression. Our findings not only illuminate the adaptation processes of international, female migrants but also suggest avenues to protect and promote their mental well-being.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1103-1108
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Immigrant and Minority Health
Volume20
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Oct 2018

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2017, Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

Keywords

  • Acculturation
  • Acculturative stress
  • Depressive symptoms
  • International migrants
  • Mental health

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