A randomized-trial evaluation of the effect of whose future is it anyway? on self-determination

Michael L. Wehmeyer, Susan B. Palmer, Youngsun Lee, Kendra Williams-Diehm, Karrie Shogren

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

85 Scopus citations

Abstract

Promoting student involvement in planning has become best practice in the field of transition. Research documents the positive impact of such efforts on greater student involvement. Research also suggests that promoting student involvement results in greater student self-determination, but a causal link has not been established. This study used a randomized-trial, placebo control group design to study the impact of intervention with the Whose Future Is It Anyway? process on self-determination. The authors also examined the impact of intervention on transition knowledge and skills. Results indicated that instruction using the Whose Future Is It Anyway? process resulted in significant, positive differences in self-determination when compared with a placebo-control group and that students who received instruction gained transition knowledge and skills.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)45-56
Number of pages12
JournalCareer Development for Exceptional Individuals
Volume34
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2011

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The author(s) disclosed receipt of the following financial support for the research and/or authorship of this article: Funding for this research was provided by Grant PR Award No. H133A031727 from the U.S. Department of Education, National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research awarded to the University of Kansas and Grant PR Award No. R324B070159 from the U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, National Center for Special Education Research, also awarded to the University of Kansas.

Keywords

  • self-determination
  • student involvement
  • transition
  • transition knowledge
  • Whose Future Is It Anyway?

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