A Quasi-Experimental Examination of Telework Eligibility and Participation in the U.S. Federal Government

David Lee, Sun Young Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

This article examines the causal effects of telework eligibility and participation on employee attitudes, including perceived fairness, job satisfaction, and intention to stay, in the U.S. federal government. Drawing on the literatures on social exchange and organizational justice, we investigate how telework eligibility and participation influence employee attitudes and whether different reasons for nonparticipation have varying impacts. Our findings show that those employees who are eligible to telework report higher levels of perceived fairness, job satisfaction, and intention to stay than do those employees who are ineligible. On the other hand, the effects of telework participation on employee attitudes depend upon the reasons why nonparticipants do not telework. Specifically, when employees do not telework because of insufficient technical or managerial support, they report significantly lower levels of perceived fairness, job satisfaction, and intention to stay than do teleworkers. However, nontelework due to job requirements or personal choice does not have significant, negative effects on work attitudes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)451-471
Number of pages21
JournalReview of Public Personnel Administration
Volume38
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Dec 2018

Keywords

  • eligibility
  • federal government
  • participation
  • telework arrangements

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