A multi-method examination of the effects of mindfulness on stress attribution, coping, and emotional well-being

Netta Weinstein, Kirk W. Brown, Richard M. Ryan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

521 Scopus citations

Abstract

Mindful individuals orient to ongoing events and experiences in a receptive, attentive manner. This experiential mode of processing suggests implications for the perception of and response to stress situations. Using laboratory-based, longitudinal, and daily diary designs, four studies examined the role of mindfulness on appraisals of and coping with stress experiences in college students, and the consequences of such stress processing for well-being. Across the four studies (n's = 65 - 141), results demonstrated that mindful individuals made more benign stress appraisals, reported less frequent use of avoidant coping strategies, and in two studies, reported higher use of approach coping. In turn, more adaptive stress responses and coping partially or fully mediated the relation between mindfulness and well-being. Implications for the role of mindfulness in stress and well-being are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)374-385
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Research in Personality
Volume43
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2009

Keywords

  • Avoidance
  • Coping
  • MAAS
  • Mindfulness
  • Stress
  • Well-being

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