A longitudinal application of the actor partner interdependence model extended mediations to the health effects of dyadic support

Serena Petrocchi, Chiara Filipponi, Peter J. Schulz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Supportive communicative experiences within close relationships, such as dyadic support, have a protective effect on individuals' health and emotional well-being. However, little is known about how partners interact in determining their own and others' health or the mechanisms through which dyadic support influences physical health. We addressed those gaps by studying 1088 romantic couples from three consecutive years (T1, T2, T3; Swiss Household Panel). The study applied a data analysis strategy called Actor Partner Interdependence Model extended Mediation, which allows for mediation processes while considering the interdependence, or non-independence, of data coming from partners. Results showed that dyadic support was positively associated with perceived health over two years through the mediation of optimistic attitudes and depressive mood, both for person and partner effects. The present study demonstrates the interplay between the dyadic process and personality dispositions in maintaining good health.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0254716
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume16
Issue number7 July
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The study has been realized using the data collected by the Swiss Centre of Expertise in the Social Sciences FORS for the Swiss Household Panel Project (SHP). FORS has received funding for the SHP project by the Swiss National Science

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 Petrocchi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

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