A double-hit of stress and low-grade inflammation on functional brain network mediates posttraumatic stress symptoms

Jungyoon Kim, Sujung Yoon, Suji Lee, Haejin Hong, Eunji Ha, Yoonji Joo, Eun Hee Lee, In Kyoon Lyoo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Growing evidence indicates a reciprocal relationship between low-grade systemic inflammation and stress exposure towards increased vulnerability to neuropsychiatric disorders, including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, the neural correlates of this reciprocity and their influence on the subsequent development of PTSD are largely unknown. Here we investigated alterations in functional connectivity among brain networks related to low-grade inflammation and stress exposure using two large independent data sets. Functional couplings among the higher-order cognitive network system including the salience, default mode, and central executive networks were reduced in association with low-grade inflammation and stress exposure. This reduced functional coupling may also be related to subsequent posttraumatic stress symptom severity. The current findings propose functional couplings among the higher-order cognitive network system as neural correlates of low-grade inflammation and stress exposure, and suggest that low-grade inflammation, alongside with stress, may render individuals more vulnerable to PTSD.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1898
JournalNature Communications
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Dec 2020

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