A chronological review of empirical research on personal information privacy concerns: An analysis of contexts and research constructs

Haejung Yun, Gwanhoo Lee, Dan J. Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

101 Scopus citations

Abstract

As concerns about personal information privacy (PIP) continue to grow, an increasing number of studies have empirically investigated the phenomenon. However, researchers are not well informed about the shift of PIP research trends with time. In particular, there is a lack of understanding of what constructs have been studied in what contexts. As a result, researchers may design their study without sufficient guidance. This problem can lead to unproductive efforts in advancing PIP research. Therefore, it is important and timely to review prior PIP research to enhance our understanding of how it has evolved. We are particularly interested in understanding the chronological changes in contexts and research constructs studied. We use a chronological stage model of PIP research we develop, a set of contextual variables identified from prior literature, and the four-party PIP model suggested by Conger et al. (2013) as theoretical foundations to conduct a chronological literature review of empirical PIP concern studies. We find several PIP research trends during the last two decades, such as the quantity of PIP research has drastically increased; the variety of contexts and research constructs being studied has increased substantially; and many constructs have been studied only once while only a few have been repeatedly studied. We also find that the focus of PIP research has shifted from general/unspecified contexts to specific ones. We discuss the contributions of the study and recommendations for future research directions. We propose a fifth party as an emergent player in the ecosystem of PIP and call for future research that investigates it.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)570-601
Number of pages32
JournalInformation and Management
Volume56
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2019

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The research of the second and the third author has been partially supported by the Kogod Cybersecurity Governance Center and the National Research Foundation of Korea Grant funded by the Korean Government (NRF-2017S1A3A2066149), respectively.

Funding Information:
Dan J. Kim is a Fulbright scholar and professor of information technology and decision sciences at the University of North Texas. His research interests are in multidisciplinary areas such as information security (InfoSec) and privacy, information assurance, and trust in electronic commerce. His research work has been published or, in forthcoming more than 150 papers, in refereed journals, peer-reviewed book chapters, and conference proceedings including ISR, JMIS, JAIS, EJIS, CACM, CAIS, DSS, IJHIC, IJEUC, IEEE Transactions on Professional Communication, Electronic Market, IEEE IT Professional, Journal of Global Information Management, and International Journal of Mobile Communications, ICIS, HICSS, AMCIS, INFORMS, ICEC, ICA, and so on. He has been awarded the National Science Foundation CyberCorps: SFS grant for multi-years, the National Security Agency grant, 2012 Emerald Management Reviews Citations of Excellence Awards, 2010 Best Published Paper Award in ISR, an Emerald Literati Network 2009 – Outstanding Paper Award, the ICIS 2003 Best Paper-First Runner-up Award, and the AMCIS 2005 Best Research Paper Award at AMCIS 2005.

Funding Information:
The research of the second and the third author has been partially supported by the Kogod Cybersecurity Governance Center and the National Research Foundation of Korea Grant funded by the Korean Government (NRF-2017S1A3A2066149), respectively. The research of the second and the third author has been partially supported by the Kogod Cybersecurity Governance Center and the National Research Foundation of Korea Grant funded by the Korean Government ( NRF-2017S1A3A2066149 ), respectively.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2018 Elsevier B.V.

Keywords

  • Chronological literature review
  • Context
  • Four-party model
  • Personal information privacy concerns
  • Research construct
  • Stage model

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